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canada. if we are glad you have joined us. coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only about halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: paul tough is a contributor for the new york times magazine, published a book on education this year, how children succeed, the hidden power of character. good have you back and congratulations on your success. can i pick apart the title? how children succeed, i get it. the hidden power of character, it seems to me that the way the kids learn is to be encouraged to try and to fail. try again, fail again, fail better. it is a wonderful quote from beckett but parents don't want their kids to fail. they are trying to get into competitive schools, but how do learned when nobody encourages
of led zeppelin. we talked to jimmy page about their special honor in the u.s. >>> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. we begin with dramatic developments in the middle east. palestinian militants have fired a rocket all the way to jerusalem for the first time in decades. they have also targeted tel aviv. israel has risen but by calling up reserve troops and stepping up its bombardment of gaza. in a moment, a report from the gaza strip were there more civilian casualties today. first, we have this report from tel aviv. >> today, and the heart of israel, sirens scream for people to take cover from rocket fire. the past 24 hours have come as quite a shock. even for the million israelis living close to gaza, fear is part of their daily lives, the mortar and rocket fire have increased dramatically. one young couple went out to look at the rocket damage to their house and the warning of another attack sent them running. fire also interrupted a funeral of one of three israelis killed yesterday. premature babies had to be moved elsewhere. israelis are ner
economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: demonstrations, clashes with the police, and tear gas in tahrir square-- familiar scenes in egypt nearly two years ago that led to the fall of longtime leader hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in
buster, a tactic used to delay legislation but republicans say the tool is key to protecting their minority rights. >> warner: on the eve of world aids day, ray suarez updates the hopes and frustrations in the fight against the deadly disease. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> warner: and is the grand canyon 60 million years older than we've long thought? we ask science correspondent miles o'brien. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: washington's clock ticked another day closer today to automatic tax hikes and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff". the president took to the road, while republicans warned there's a deadlock in efforts to reach a deficit deal. >> now, of course, santa delivers everywhere. i've b
, a different threat from the one that we were used to with bin laden but a threat nonetheless, i think the answer increasingly yes s yes. they didn't want the public to see that effort as anything other than a great success. that was part of obama's appeal. so i'd say on the particular details, i don't see much. on the broad theme, did they want the public to feel al qaeda was down for the count? yes, i think they did. >> rose: we conclude with julian sands, a british actor, talking about harold pinter, the english playwright and nobel laureate. >> in comparison with harold, other people looked blurred because he was such a life force. he was so present. he was so forceful. and he lived by pure intention. >> rose: aluf, david ignatius and julian sands when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin with attacks by israel and hamas. in israel, three civilians have been killed and dozens wounded, hamas has fired more than one thousand rockets into israel, many of which have been intercepted by the ir
years after a massive oil spill at daily inched the u.s. coast. --deluged the u.s. coast. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. there are real concerns that the conflict between palestinian militants in gaza and israel could spark a wider conflict in the region. air raid fire sounded in the israeli city of tel aviv as rockets were fired towards it. the assaults underlines the rising tension. >> tonight, sirens sounding across tel aviv. the commercial capital and most populous city now a target for the rockets being fired by militants -- militants in gaza. people to cover bread they could. there were no casualties -- people took cover where they could. there were no casualties. >> i saw a flash of light. 2 kilometers in the direction of the seat. the rocket landed in the seat. >> targeting tel aviv marks a significant escalation of this growing conflict. the body of the man held responsible by his it -- by israel for launching hundreds of rockets from gauze that. -- gaza. at his funeral in gaza city, the military commander was carried to the streets
-elect, enrique pena nieto, this afternoon. one topic for them and for us tonight: the war on drugs, on both sides of the border. >> suarez: as lawmakers talk of reducing the country's debt, paul solman offers a history lesson on centuries of federal borrowing. >> the united states was going into default. we defaulted on many obligations to foreign creditors and to our own soldiers. >> brown: plus, every month, 1,000 young americans are infected with h.i.v., and most of those with the disease don't even know they have it. hari sreenivasan looks at a new report from the c.d.c. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. th
recognition that the palestinians were seeking. israel and the u.s. were opposed. it could delay hopes for achieving an independent palestinian state through peace talks. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton said the vote was unfortunate and counterproductive. >> a landmark day in and often turbulent history. jubilant palestinians to i heard there president demand what he said was their basic right to self-determination. >> the moment has arrived for the world to see clearly. enough with the settlements and occupation we are here now. >> after days of diplomacy, the majority backed palestine's bid to be recognized as a nation, but without full membership. many in a yasser arafat a square felt this was a symbolic than significant day, were the of celebration. a little -- the political activists are happy, but know that the struggle continues. >> we learned not to get our hopes up, not to get high expectations. we will wait. but we feel that we are heading in the right direction. >> israeli control over the occupied territories will not end as a result of the u.n. vote. the palestinia
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policy and a former u.s. envoy to the middle east. >> and abrams on the council for foreign relations a deputy national security advisor for global democracy strategy for president bush. his book tested by zion comes out later this year and i am pleased to have all of them here on this program this evening. i begin with dennis ross, tell me where you think we are at this moment, dennis. >> well, i do think the outline of the cease-fire are probably getting pretty close to being finalized, i don't think they are quite finalized yet, not because the outlines are unclear but because i think there is probably a desire to have the secretary of state make certain that the understandings are understood the same way by all of the parties, number one, number 2, that there are actually promises that are made on those understandings and commitments made to the united states as a way of making it more likely that promises made will be upheld. so i think there is a decent chance there is going to be a cease-fire, but in my experience in this part of the world and having been involved in a lot of n
obama becomes the first u.s. president [indiscernible] pressing for reforms. >> you will not believe the scientific advance that has this dog back on his feet. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. the u.n. secretary-general is among those calling for an immediate end to the violence in gaza. his words come as more than 100 have been killed in the past week of fighting. the majority of them palestinians. palestinian militants have continued firing weapons into israel. in cairo, discussions are ongoing about cease-fire. jeremy our coverage from gaza. >> good morning, gaza. this was the wake-up call sent in by israel. growing up in gaza is not easy. not far away, is the rubble left by the israeli strike on sunday that killed 10 members of this family including four children and two neighbors. they are looking for the remains of a teenage girl missing and presumed dead. this man is a relative of the dead. >> sad, may be strong. >> street are getting tougher, more solid. when they tell the parents of a boy, he will grow up for revenge. >> during the
for south africa. >> tired of turkey after thanksgiving? how about some sushi. anthony more dane talk to us about the food that inspired his new graphic novel. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. across egypt today there have been violent protests following the president's decision to grant himself sweeping new powers. buildings belonging to the muslim brotherhood party have been ransacked, with some set on fire. the president says he has taken on the powers to help steer the country through the difficult transition to democracy, but critics claim he is trying to make himself a new pharaoh. >> fury in egypt as president morsi gives himself a big, new powers. there were protests across the country. in cairo, the crowds flooded back to tahrir square, where last year they celebrated the ousting of hosni mubarak. now they say the new president has become even more of the dictator with an edict saying the courts cannot challenge him. >> he is taking more power than mubarak. >> it was only days ago that the president was basking in the world and american a
that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: after another day of violence, a ceasefire deal between israel and hamas was finally announced in cairo today. but further negotiations on key longer-term sticking points between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his side. >> egypt has exerted efforts and conducted intensive discussions since the renewed outbreak of hostilities in the gaza strip with all parties: the palestinian leadership, the these efforts and communications managed to reach an agreement to a ceasefire and the return of calm and halt of the violence and the bloodshed that was witnessed recently. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a ceasefire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. in the days ahe
store hours. >> reporter: this is the calm before the storm at a chicago toys r us. manager danny soro thinks up to 10,000 shoppers will descend on the store when it opens thanksgiving evening, forcing his 300 employees to cut short their holiday. >> we open at 8:00 and we're expecting lines to start from 5 pm to go pretty much throughout the plaza. >> reporter: walmart, kmart, and sears are also opening tomorrow at 8pm; target's opening at 9:00pm. and while opening on turkey day is expected to mean big business for retailers, it's ruffling the feathers of many employees who won't get paid overtime to work the holiday. >> i feel very frustrated about this situation. >> reporter: walmart associate charmaine givens is scheduled to work two eight hour shifts with a three hour break starting tomorrow at 7 pm. >> i'm not gonna do that, no. >> reporter: you're just not going to show up? >> i'm going to call in. i'm gonna call in. i'm not going to just abandon the job. i'm gonna call in and i'm gonna state how i feel. >> reporter: givens hopes to join other walmart employees around the countr
. a broader calm return. pete: is the u.s. still the key to stopping the violence? at home, posturing and positioning over the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> would you subpoena a deal that does not include tax rate increases for the wealthy? is that something that's acceptable? >> no. pete: and a candid assessment of the stakes from one of the g.o.p.'s rising stars. >> the fiscal cliff is a creation of the political branch in washington, d.c. and an example of a dysfunctional process. that threatens our economy and millions of people across our economy. pete: is stalemate in washington stifling the economic recovery? joining us this thanksgiving week, peter baker of "the new york times." molly ball of "the atlantic." and jim tankersly of "national journal." >> award winning reporting and analysis. covering history as it happens. from our nationas capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." produced in association with "national journal." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to chart a greener path in the air and in our factories.
economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american economy looked online today, as digital deals were to be had, and holiday shoppers lit up web sites. retailers had high hopes that cyber monday sales would add to what's been a strong start so far. >> if all goes as expected, today will end up being the busiest online david year, with major bargains and steep discountses just a click away. >> every year we see more and more consumers shopping is online, both the younger computer born with a computer in their crib, and the elder generation is now also shopping online. deals are become, plentiful. >> all told the research firm comstore, estimates americans will spend $1.
for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the battle for control of syria reached ever closer to the capital today. heavy fighting flared near the damascus airport, and online access was cut, as the pressure intensified on president bashar al-assad. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: it could be the west's worst nightmare. jubilant jihadist fighters near damascus. this group has captured a helicopter and these islamists are now in the vanguard of syria's rebel army. syrian warplanes and helicopters were filmed attacking the fringes of the capital today. and to the road to the international airport has been closed by fighting. and as that figh
administration is re-using digital information gathered for the campaign to rally support now. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington was a-whirl today with more talk of avoiding the much-discussed fiscal cliff. but as november wound down, the president suggested an agreement on taxes and spending could come in time for the holidays. >> i believe that both parties can agree on a frame work that does that in the coming weeks. in fact my hope is to get this done before christmas. >> you know me, i was born with the glass half full. i'm an optimist. >> brown: hopeful signs emanated from the white house and the capitol today, about getting a deal before the new year brings automatic tax hikes and spending cuts. president obama offered his optimism at an event with middle-class americans
with israel, people are used to the airstrikes that come, the craters that pockmark the countryside and that destroy their buildings. let's face, it's happened now every few years. so when you come here, you'll find a sense of relief and immediate happiness, of course, but people are pretty skeptical about whether the peace will last. >> ( translated ): god willing i hope it holds but i'm 50/50. they've been breaking their promises since the prophet's day. >> reporter: mobility scooter meets hamas flag. ahmed atah lost both legs in the last israeli invasion. so, will a ceasefire become a peace? "it could," he said, "but first we need to give thanks to president morsi of egypt." across gaza, he's something of a new hero, and they're even impressed in israel. the egyptian president right now the best hope for peacekeeping here. >> egypt was able to regain it's regional role as a regional player, mediating between the israelis and the palestinians in convincing both of them to reach a ceasefire agreement. in the city, the flags, the rallies, talking up victory. in the countryside, the
. in the past, military strikes have been used to send messages about the toughness of israeli leaders. >> we will take whatever action is necessary to put a stop to this. this is not merely our right. it is also our duty. >> hamas has sworn to hit back. they said the same thing during the last gossan warner -- gazan war. this showed limitations against israel's army. before the assassination, the egyptian government had been working to establish a cease- fire, and efforts have been praised by top security officials. egypt's president is a leader of the muslim brotherhood. the assassination will be seen as a calculated and dangerous insult. egypt strongly condemns what israel is doing in gaza. this is an unacceptable act, and we deeply condemn it. >> what has changed since the war? the west and israel have lost their most reliable friend, and egypt's president mubarak. they saw him as an indispensable part of the solution at times like this. >> heightened tensions in the middle east tonight. in other news from around the world, the united nations secretary general ban ki moon has set a report
of diplomacy involving the u.n. secretary general and the secretary general -- and the u.s. secretary of state. from gaza, jeremy bowen reports. a warning, you might find some of these images distressing. >> because i came back to life after the cease-fire began. -- gaza came back to life after the cease-fire began. coming to another israeli bombing campaign felt like another victory. this was the hamas interior ministry. governing with or without a cease-fire will be harder with the main administrative center ron. in jerusalem tonight, is real hint that more military action if the new cease-fire does not hold. >> i know there are citizens expecting a more severe military action, and perhaps we will need to do so but at this time, the right thing for the state of israel is to use this opportunity to achieve a lasting cease-fire. >> an attack on a bus in tel aviv was praised by hamas, but not claimed by them. both sides wanted this deal. all this, and rockets hit in the city from gaza and has dented a sense of security. a ceasefire will not necessarily bring israel could not have kept them from
a program about alleged child use by a former bbc star was dropped. the director general resigned following another report accusing another politician's sex abuse. >> is this the man to save the bbc? the broadcaster's crisis has claimed some senior staff. tim davies is charged with studying the ship. it was the flagship news program, "newsnight" that made two mistakes, wrongly accusing politicians. that led to the resignation of the director general. the new acting boss is trying to reestablish public faith. >> it has been a very difficult episode and the bbc it is all about trust. bbc needs to be trusted. if we have not got that we have not done anything. what i have done over the last day at has been a busy day, have focused on creating a simple change of command in the news and worked on how i can get assurances as the man in charge in the output we have to be trustworthy. >> that means a reshuffle. two senior executives, and her deputy have been asked to step aside for the time being. already there is a new headache. questions in parliament. his $700,000 severance package has been criti
to stand up to the people who were in power under president mubarak? >> but that will not give us the kind of freedom that we want. you cannot be a dictator to gain freedom from dictatorship. what you can do is to say, trust me to do x, y, and that. he can't bring in these forces and -- he can bring in these forces and say, i need you to be my checks and balances. we do not have a separation of powers. the only checks and balances we have right now is the street. we have a triangle, which is the military. these people on the support have -- on the street have been pushed aside. the revolution will keep him honest. >> there will be demonstrations in the streets tomorrow. we will be following that as well. joining me. or now to syria where the rebel- held area of the baskets claims that he -- of damascus claims that government forces bombed a playground full of children. the shell landed near a refugee camp where nearly 12,000 are living in awful conditions. >> atma camp, for 12,000 people this is as far away from the war they can get. it is wet and cold, even before the winter has really s
that they must avoid what has come to be known as the dreaded fiscal cliff, the congressional leaders used the world "constructive" once each to describe today's white house meeting and the white house used it twice in its official statement. so did we see any real movement today or was it all just rhetoric, david? >> well, i think the first thing we saw is that the two sides have agreed it's in their interests to agree reasonable. during the campaign, everybody wanted to be resolute in their position. now we're in the appearing reasonable thing. secondly, as we saw mitch mcconnell say, the republicans have conceded that taxes are going to go up. there remains this huge issue which was not as far as we could tell resolved or discussed today, is the president going to insist on raising tax rates on the rich, or will he come up with some other way to get money out of rich people that the republicans find more palatable, perhaps by limiting deductions or something. gwen: today, i flash back to the previous conversations, helene, in which everyone comes out at separate microphones and they're
criminal fine in u.s. history. we examine the legal resolution of the gulf coast spill, two years later. >> suarez: science correspondent miles o'brien asks an age old question. why do we sleep? the answer comes from an unlikely underwater source. >> no, you don't need more sleep? you're getting plenty of sleep right? are you getting plenty of sleep? yes. >> brown: china's new leader will head both the communist party and the military. we assess the change at the top in beijing. >> suarez: and we close with the story of volunteers stepping up to help victims of hurricane sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who have been without attention for a long time. some with, some without running water. definitely without power. you know, so as time goes, it gets worse. and i'm afraid if we don't like, really get this situation under control. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. support
surrounds us. sometimes, it's obvious, and sometimes, it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. >> bnsf railway support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: there was no let-up today in the battle between israel and hamas, the palestinian group that rules gaza. air strikes echoed across gaza, and rockets landed near tel aviv and, for the first time, near jerusalem. the combined death toll reached 30--
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

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